L'invitation au voyage Puddle Wonderful
Love my boys! #bostonterrier #luckygirl ❤️

Love my boys! #bostonterrier #luckygirl ❤️

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

Credit

(via ethiopienne)

huffingtonpost:

Do yourself a favor and watch this vine exactly one billion times with the sound on here and see this Llama frolic to DMX.

huffingtonpost:

Do yourself a favor and watch this vine exactly one billion times with the sound on here and see this Llama frolic to DMX.

translatorsanonymous:

alleoop:

chisanaai:

dnotive:

oh.

OH.

#SHOTSFIRED

#rocketslaunched

translatorsanonymous:

alleoop:

chisanaai:

dnotive:

oh.

OH.

#SHOTSFIRED

#rocketslaunched

(Source: doomy)

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

fuckyeahmexico:

This is the TLALOC-II TC mobile robot, named after the Aztec god of the rain Tlaloc. It was used extensively for navigation and excavation purposes in the pyramids of Teotihuacan near Mexico City. TLALOC-II TC incorporates many sensors utilizing radar technology.
zafra1984mexprogressivo submitted

fuckyeahmexico:

This is the TLALOC-II TC mobile robot, named after the Aztec god of the rain Tlaloc. It was used extensively for navigation and excavation purposes in the pyramids of Teotihuacan near Mexico City. TLALOC-II TC incorporates many sensors utilizing radar technology.

submitted

lifeslashdream:

forever-river-song:

Portraits of Toddlers Eating Lemons for the First Time

This is the best photo set I have seen

(Source: pleated-jeans.com, via pinklingo)

virtual-artifacts:

Human skull decorated with a polychromic mosaic • Mixtec-Aztec, Mexico • 1300-1521 A.D. • Tessels of turquoise, hematite and tumbaga gold sheets • H. 14.5 cm • Private collection

virtual-artifacts:

Human skull decorated with a polychromic mosaic • Mixtec-Aztec, Mexico • 1300-1521 A.D. • Tessels of turquoise, hematite and tumbaga gold sheets • H. 14.5 cm • Private collection

(via fuckyeahmexico)

thesmithian:

darkskinnedblackbeauty:

Khanyi - South Africa
Photographed by: @Blakkrow / Photography
http://universeontheedge.tumblr.com

[meaningful glance]

thesmithian:

darkskinnedblackbeauty:

Khanyi - South Africa

Photographed by: @Blakkrow / Photography

http://universeontheedge.tumblr.com

[meaningful glance]

New research shows ancient Maya women were powerful leaders

theswansays:

Cynthia Robin, a professor of anthropology at Northwestern University, called Patel’s research a “very significant finding” and stressed the importance of looking at history to inform the present.

“One of the things we know about Maya society is before the Spanish conquest there was no glass ceiling for women as there appears to be in our own society,” she said.

Robin said that in Maya culture, women were heads of state as well as war lords.

“One of the great things about archaeological research is that it can show us how different life was in the past and how it is in the future,” she said. “So if we assume that gender relations were always the same then we’re just kind of justifying the inequalities that exist today.”

(via mydaywithd)

cultura-y-rebeldia:

"Sin maíz no hay país"

cultura-y-rebeldia:

"Sin maíz no hay país"

(Source: histrionicenlightenment, via fuckyeahmexico)

Soaking up the sun with Squid☺️❤️ #bostonterrier #dog

Soaking up the sun with Squid☺️❤️ #bostonterrier #dog

salsamemes:

One in five teenagers will experiment with salsa.  Have you talked to your kids about salsa?

salsamemes:

One in five teenagers will experiment with salsa.  Have you talked to your kids about salsa?

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